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Troy

Troy, about 1000 years before its destruction by the troops of Agamemnon. 2331: Troy ca. 2200 BC. Model based on James Mellaart's reconstruction of layer IIg. Museum für vor und Frügeschichte, Berlin.

"The end of Troy will never end ... The flame that consumed it will itself never be consumed." (G. K. Chesterton).


Troy—also called Ilium, Ilion, or Ilios—is a Phrygian city in northwestern Asia Minor in the region called the Troad. At the time of the Trojan War, Troy was a well-walled city, with broad streets and beautiful palaces. Many Asian allies, among which the Ascanians, the AMAZONS, the Lycians, and the Eastern Ethiopians, came with their armies to help the besieged city.

Emigration of Dardanus 1

Dardanus 1, son of Zeus and the Pleiad Electra 3 lived in Samothrace, but when his brother Iasion, who was among the most handsome, was killed by Zeus with a thunderbolt because of his love affair with Demeter, he left the island, and coming to the opposite mainland he settled in the territory, which at the time was ruled by Teucer 2. Some say that this emigration took place because life in Samothrace, with its poor soil and boisterous sea, was hard for Dardanus 1 and his people. So sailing from the island, he came to the Hellespont, settling in the region afterwards called Phrygia.

The Teucrians

Teucer 2, son of the river god Scamander 1 and the nymph Idaea 1, was then king of that country, and the people were called Teucrians after him. King Teucer 2 welcomed the foreigner, and gave him his daughter Batia 1 as wife, and along with her, a share of his land. Those who are interested in proving that the Trojans were Greeks affirm that Teucer 2 had himself emigrated from Attica, and that the reason why he received Dardanus 1 with generous hospitality is that he was glad to see arrive new Greek colonists to this land which had but a small native population, and that he believed Dardanus 1 would assist him in his wars against the barbarians.

Dardania

Dardanus 1 founded a city in the region that later was called the Troad, and lived there with his family until the death of his father-in-law, upon which he became king of the whole land and called it Dardania after himself.

Family of Dardanus 1

According to some, Batia 1 was Dardanus 1's second wife, whom he married after the death of his first wife Chryse 3. His sons by Chryse 3 were Idaeus 4 and Deimas. The latter remained in Arcadia, whence they come (as it is said that Atlas was king of Arcadia), but Idaeus 4 emigrated with Dardanus 1, first to Samothrace, and later to Phrygia, where Mount Ida was called after him

Location of Troy in Asia Minor

Erichthonius 1 and Tros 1

When Dardanus 1 died, his son Erichthonius 1 became king of the Dardanians and the richest of men, as he inherited both the kingdom of his father, and that of his maternal grandfather. Erichthonius 1 married Astyoche 3 (daughter of the river god Simois), or as others say, Callirrhoe 3, a sister of Teucer 2. By one of them he had a son Tros 1, who after coming to the throne, called the people Trojans, and the land Troad after himself. According to some, it was Tros 1 who married Callirrhoe 3, but other assert that he married Acallaris, daughter of Eumedes 6.

The founder of Troy

Ilus 2, son of Tros 1, founded the city of Ilium (Troy) that he called after himself. Ilus 2 went to Phrygia, and taking part in games that at the time were held by the king, he won a victory in wrestling. As a prize, he received fifty youths and as many maidens, and the king, obeying an oracle, gave him also a cow, and asked him to found a city wherever the cow should lie down. The cow rested in the hill of Ate, and in that spot Ilus 2 built the city which he called Ilium. Then he prayed to Zeus that a sign might be shown to him, and he saw the Palladium fallen from heaven and lying before his tent. Ilus 2 was then blinded, for the Palladium might not be looked upon by any man. But later, when he had made offerings to the goddess, he recovered his sight. In this way, the kingdom of Dardanus 1 and Erichthonius 1 was divided, because while Ilus 2 became king of Ilium (Troy), his brother Assaracus continued to be king of the Dardanians.

Tricky Laomedon 1

Map of the plain of Troy showing the changes that have taken place over time. The green line shows the coastline in 1200 BC. This map appears in Peter Connolly's rich illustrated book The Ancient Greece of Odysseus (Oxford University Press, 1998).

According to some, Ilus 2's wife was Eurydice 6, and according to others Leucippe 5. By either of them Ilus 2 had a son Laomedon 1, who became king of Troy after him. When Laomedon 1 was king of Troy, Apollo and Poseidon decided to put him to the test. Assuming the likeness of mortal men, the two gods undertook to fortify Troy for wages. But when the work was done, King Laomedon 1 would not pay their wages. So Apollo sent a pestilence, and Poseidon sent a sea-monster that snatched away the people of the plain. The oracles foretold deliverance from these calamities if Laomedon 1 would expose his daughter Hesione 2 to be devoured by the sea-monster. So he, more obedient of this oracle than of his agreement with the gods, exposed Hesione 2 to the monster by fastening her to the rocks near the sea. When Heracles 1 saw her exposed, he promised to save her on condition of receiving from Laomedon 1 the mares which Zeus had given in compensation for the rape of Ganymedes. Once again Laomedon 1 promised to pay for the service, and Heracles 1 killed the monster and saved Hesione 2. But when this was accomplished, Laomedon 1 would not give the agreed reward.

First war against Troy

For this reason, Heracles 1 made war on Troy one generation before the well known Trojan War. This attack on Troy, Heracles 1 did it in conjunction with, among others, Telamon, father of Ajax 1. Heracles 1 deployed eighteen ships with fifty oars each, that is, an insignificant fleet compared to the one that sailed against Troy one generation after [see ACHAEAN LEADERS for details about this fleet]. After some fight, the town was besieged, and shortly after Telamon, who was the first to breach in the wall, entered the city. After him came Heracles 1, who killed Laomedon 1 and his sons except for young Priam 1, who was then appointed king of Troy. The king's daughter Hesione 2 was given to Telamon as a prize. Hesione 2 is mother of Teucer 1, who became leader of the Salaminians against Troy one generation after.

Second war against Troy
(See Trojan War).

Survival of the House of Dardanus 1

In Dardania, Assaracus was succeeded on the throne by his son Capys 1, who towards the end of the Trojan War is said to have recommended throwing the WOODEN HORSE into the sea. Capys 1 is father of Anchises 1, who is father of Aeneas, leader of the Dardanians during the Trojan War. Aeneas is remembered for his courage and piety, and as the one who was destined to survive and to save the House of Dardanus 1 from extinction. For Aeneas, escaping from the flames of the sacked Troy, emigrated to Italy where he founded a kingdom which in time gave birth to Rome.


Throne Succession: Troy, Alba Longa, Rome 

= Descendants of Atlas

= Other families

= Roman kings

(Throne succession in Alba Longa according to Dionysius of Halicarnassus)
The Troad
Italy
Notes
Troy
Dardania
Latium
Dardanus 1

Dardanus 1, son of Zeus and the Pleiad Electra 3 came from Samothrace.

Erichthonius 1

Son of Dardanus 1.

Tros 1

Son of Erichthonius 1.

Troy
Dardania
Latium
Ilus 2
Assaracus
Faunus 1

Ilus 2 and Assaracus are sons of Tros 1 , probably by different mothers.
Faunus is son either of Picus and Canens, or of Circe.

Laomedon 1
Capys 1
Latinus 1
Laomedon 1 was son of Ilus 2.
Capys 1 is son of Assaracus.
Parentages attributed to Latinus 1:

Faunus 1 & Marica.
Odysseus & Calypso 3.
Telemachus & Circe.
Odysseus & Circe.
Heracles 1 & Hyperborean Girl.

Priam 1

Anchises 1

Priam 1, son of Laomedon 1, was the overlord in the Troad.
Anchises 1 is son of Capys 1.


Hector 1

Aeneas

Hector 1 and Aeneas are uncrowned successors in Troy and Dardania respectively. Hector 1 died in the Trojan War and Aeneas emigrated to Italy.

Lavinium-Alba Longa
 

Aeneas

Son of Anchises 1. Aeneas came to Latium as an exile after the Trojan War.

Ascanius 2

Son of Aeneas.

 
Silvius

Son of Aeneas.

Silvius Aeneas

Son of Silvius.

Latinus 2

Son of Silvius.

Alba

Son of Latinus 2.

Capetus 4

Unknown parentage. Others say that Alba was succeeded by Epytus 2 (Epitus Silva), but the parentage of Epytus 2 is also unknown.

Capys 2

Son of Epytus 2.

Capetus 2

Son of Capys 2.

Tiberinus 2

Son of Capetus 2. 

Agrippa

Son of Tiberinus 2.

Allodius

Unknown parentage.

Aventinus 2

Unknown parentage.

Proca

Son of Aventinus 2.

Amulius

Son of Proca.

Numitor 2

Son of Proca.

Rome
 

Romulus

Parentages attributed to Romulus, founder of Rome:

Ares & Ilia.
Aeneas & Dexithea 2.
Latinus 1 & Roma 3.
Ares & Aemilia.
Phantom & Tarchetius' Maid.
Amulius & Ilia.
Romulus & Tatius

Tatius was king of the Sabines; his parentage is unknown.

Interregnum

Collective rule.

Numa 3

Son of Pompon 1.

Tullus Hostilius

Unknown parentage.

Ancus Marcius

Son of Marcius 2, son of Marcius 1. His mother was Pompilia, daughter of Numa 3.

Tarquinius Priscus

Son of Demaratus from Corinth.

Servius Tullius

Son of Hephaestus and Ocresia

Tarquinius Superbus

Son of Tarquinius Priscus. Father of Sextus Tarquinius, the man who raped Lucretia 2, causing the fall of monarchy.

Consuls:
Tarquinius Collatinus
Lucius Junius Brutus

Tarquinius Collatinus, husband of Lucretia 2, was son of Egerius, son of Arruns 2, son of Demaratus from Corinth.


Dardanus 1, grieved at his brother Iasion's death, left Samothrace and came to the country where the Teucrians dwelt, and called it Dardania. His descendants founded Troy. Dardanus 1 is son of Zeus and Electra 3, one of the PLEIADES. By Chryse 3, daughter of Pallas 8, he became father of Idaeus 4 and Deimas. By Batia 1 (daughter of Teucer 1, son of Scamander 1, one of the RIVER GODS) he became father of Ilus 1, Erichthonius 1, and Zacynthus. Others have said that his wife was Olizone, daughter of Phineus 2, and that by her he had Erichthonius 1 (Apd.3.12.1-2; Col.286; DH.1.50.3, 1.61.2; Dictys 4.22; Dio.4.75.1, 5.48.2; Hyg.Ast.2.21; Hyg.Fab.155; Nonn.3.195; Ov.Fast.4.31, 4.33; QS.2.141, 13.558; Vir.Aen.8.134).

Erichthonius 1. King of the Dardanians, who became, as they say, the richest of men, since he inherited both the kingdom of his father and that of his maternal grandfather. He was son of Dardanus 1, son of Zeus and Electra 3 (one of the PLEIADES); his mother was Batia 1, daughter of Teucer 2, son of Scamander 1 (one of the RIVER GODS). Others have said that his mother was Olizone, daughter of Phineus 2. Erichthonius 1 is father of Tros 1, after whom the Trojans were called. Tros 1's mother was either Astyoche 3, daughter of Simois (one of the RIVER GODS), or Callirrhoe 3, daughter of Scamander 1 (Apd.3.12.2; DH.1.62.1-2; Dictys 4.22; Hom.Il.20.219; Ov.Fast.4.33).

Tros 1 called the people of the land Trojans, after his own name. He was son of Erichthonius 1 (son of Dardanus 1, son of Zeus and Electra 3, one of the PLEIADES); his mother was either Astyoche 3 (daughter of Simois, one of the RIVER GODS) or Callirrhoe 3, otherwise called his wife. By Callirrhoe 3, daughter of the river god Scamander 1, he had children: Cleopatra 3, Ilus 2 (the founder of Troy), Assaracus, and Ganymedes; but some say that he had Assaracus by Acallaris, daughter of Eumedes 6. Tros 1 is also said to be the father of Cleomestra (Apd.3.12.2; DH.1.62.2; Dictys 4.22; Dio.4.75.3).

Ilus 2 founded the city of Ilium (Troy) that he called after himself. Ilus 2 went to Phrygia, and taking part in games that at the time were held by the king, he won victory in wrestling. As a prize he received fifty youths and as many maidens; and the king, obeying an oracle, gave him also a cow and asked him to found a city wherever the cow should lie down. This took place when the cow came to the hill of Ate, and in that spot Ilus 2 built the city which he called Ilium. Then he prayed to Zeus that a sign might be shown to him and he saw the Palladium, fallen from heaven and lying before his tent. Ilus 2 was blinded, since the Palladium was not to be looked upon by any man. But later, when he had made offerings to the goddess, he recovered his sight. Ilus 2 was son of Tros 1 (eponym of the Trojans), son of Erichthonius 1, son of Dardanus 1, son of Zeus and Electra 3, one of the PLEIADES. His mother was Callirrhoe 3, daughter of Scamander 1, one of the RIVER GODS. He had children by Eurydice 6 (daughter of Adrastus 2): Themiste and Laomedon 1, but the latter is also called son of Ilus 2 and Leucippe 5. Also Tithonus 1 has been called son of Ilus 2 (Apd.3.12.2-3; Dictys 4.22; Hyg.Fab.250; Plu.PS.17).

Assaracus. King of the Dardanians, who lived in the region about Troy. He was son of Tros 1, after whom the Trojans were called, in turn son of Erichthonius 1, son of Dardanus 1, son of Zeus and Electra 3, one of the PLEIADES. His mother was Callirrhoe 3, daughter of the river god Scamander 1, or perhaps Acallaris, daughter of Eumedes 6, otherwise unknown. He has also been called son of Aesyetes and Cleomestra. Assaracus married either Hieromneme, daughter of the river god Simois, or Clytodora, daughter of King Laomedon 1 of Troy, and he fathered, by one of them, Ganymedes and Capys 1. The latter, who recommended throwing the WOODEN HORSE into the sea, was father of Anchises 1 (Apd.3.12.2; DH.1.62.2; Dictys 4.22; Dio.4.75.5; Hyg.Fab.224; Ov.Fast.4.34).

Faunus 1 (Phaunus 1). A half-goat god. Faunus 1 is sometimes identified with Pan, or else regarded as one of the SATYRS. Otherwise Faunus 1 is called king of Latium (Italy). He is counted among those who joined Dionysus 2 in his Indian campaign. Faunus 1 is son of Picus & Canens, or of someone unknown and Circe. Faunus is father of Acis by a nymph (Nymph 2 Symaethian) (see also NYMPHS and Polyphemus 2). By Marica he fathered Latinus 1 (see also NYMPHS. Latinus 1 is the king of Latium who was succeeded by Aeneas, who also married his daughter Lavinia 2). By Dryope 2 he became father of Tarquitus (see also NYMPHS. Tarquitus was an ally of Turnus, the man who opposed Aeneas in Italy). By Ismenis he had a son Crenaeus 4 who was a defender of Thebes against the SEVEN (see also NYMPHS). By someone unknown he fathered Eurymedon 6, defender of the Hypsistan gate at Thebes during the war of the SEVEN. Faunus 1 also consorted with a Hyperborean Girl (DH.1.43.1; Nonn.13.328, 37.11, 37.56; Ov.Fast.2.268ff., 5.99; Ov.Met.14.450ff., 13.750; Plu.Num.15.3; Stat.Theb.7.262, 9.319; Vir.Aen.7.48, 10.550ff.).

Laomedon 1. When Laomedon 1 was king of Troy, Apollo and Poseidon decided to put him to the test and, assuming the likeness of mortal men, fortified the city for wages. But when the work was done, King Laomedon 1 would not pay their wages; so Apollo sent a pestilence, and Poseidon sent a sea-monster, which snatched away the people of the plain. The oracles foretold deliverance from these calamities if King Laomedon 1 would expose his daughter Hesione 2 to be devoured by the sea-monster. So he, more obedient of this oracle than of his agreement with the gods, exposed Hesione 2 to the monster by fastening her to the rocks near the sea. When Heracles 1 saw her exposed, he promised to save her on condition of receiving from Laomedon 1 the mares which Zeus had given in compensation for the rape of Ganymedes. Once again Laomedon 1 promised to pay for the service and Heracles 1 killed the monster and saved Hesione 2. But when this was done Laomedon 1 would not give the agreed reward. For this reason Heracles 1 made war on Troy one generation before the well known Trojan War. Heracles 1 performed his attack in conjunction with Telamon, father of Ajax 1, deploying for this purpose eighteen ships with fifty oars each, which is an insignificant fleet compared to the one which sailed against Troy one generation after. After some fight the town was besieged and shortly after Telamon, who was the first to breach in the wall, entered the city and after him came Heracles 1. Heracles 1 or Telamon killed King Laomedon 1 and his sons except for young Priam 1, who became then king of Troy. Laomedon 1 was son of Ilus 2, the founder of Ilium (Troy) and the son of Tros 1 (after whom the Trojans are called), son of Erichthonius 1, son of Dardanus 1, son of Zeus and Electra 3, one of the PLEIADES. Laomedon 1's mother was either Eurydice 6, daughter of Adrastus 2, or Leucippe 5. His wife was either Strymo (daughter of Scamander 1, one of the RIVER GODS), or Placia (daughter of Otreus 1), or Leucippe 2; by one of these three Laomedon 1 begot children: Tithonus 1, Lampus 2, Clytius 5, Hicetaon 1, Priam 1, Hesione 2, Cilla, Astyoche 4, and also Thymoetes 1. Laomedon 1 also had a son Bucolion 2 by Calybe 1 (one of the NYMPHS). And by unknown wives he fathered Proclia, Clytodora, and Antigone 3 (Apd.2.5.9, 2.6.4, 3.12.3; Apd.Ep.3.24; DH.1.62.2; Dictys 4.22; Hom.Il.7.452; Hyg.Fab.31, 250; Ov.Met.6.93; Pin.Nem.3.36).

Ganymedes. 7910: Guillaume (II) Couston 1716-1777: Ganymede. Marble. Victoria and Albert Museum, London.

Capys 1. Father of Anchises 1, either by Themiste, or by Hieromneme. The latter is sometimes said to be his mother, who otherwise is called Clytodora. His father was King Assaracus of Dardania, son of Tros 1, son of Erichthonius 1, son of Dardanus 1, son of Zeus and Electra 3, one of the PLEIADES. Capys 1, who was still alive at the time of the Trojan War, is remembered for having recommended to throw the WOODEN HORSE into the sea (Apd.3.12.2; DH.1.62.2; Dio.4.75.5; Vir.Aen.2.35).

Priam 1 was king of Troy when the Trojan War took place, and his fate was that of utter ruin for his country, his family, and himself. Hi was son of Laomedon 1 (Apd.3.12.3-5; Apd.Ep.5.21; Hom.Il. passim; QS.13.238; SI.1; Try.634; Vir.Aen.2.550ff., 8.157).

Anchises 1, who was comely as the gods, was loved by Aphrodite. His son Aeneas saved him from the fire of Troy, and he went into exile. Years later he died in Sicily, but Aeneas, who met him in the Elysian Fields, learned from him some mysteries of life, including his own destiny. He was son of Capys 1 (Apd.3.12.2; Apd.Ep.5.21; DH.1.62.2; Dio.4.75.5, 7.4.1; Hes.The.1008; Hom.Aph.5.70; Hom.Il.5.265, 5.313, 13.429, 23.290; Hyg.Fab.94; Ov.Met.13.680; Pau.8.12.8; QS.13.317ff.; Vir.Aen.3.709, 6.679, 6.711ff.).

Latinus 1. King of Latium (the country in central Italy where Rome is situated). Latinus 1 was succeeded by Aeneas, who married his daughter Lavinia 2. Latinus 1's wife Amata wished to marry her daughter to Turnus, the man who opposed Aeneas in Italy, and there was war to decide which of them should marry Lavinia 2. Latinus 1 perished in this war, killed by the Rutulians, the people of Latium that were ruled by Turnus; but Turnus was defeated by Aeneas and Amata hanged herself. In disagreement with some chronologies Latinus 1 is sometimes called father of Romulus, whom he should have begotten by Roma 3, daughter of Roma 1; by the same woman he had two other sons, Romus and Telegonus 4. By an unknown woman he fathered Leucaria, wife of Italus, son of Telegonus 3 and Penelope. He was also father of Laurine, whom she married to Locrus. The parentage of Latinus 1 is disputed as well; for some say that he was the son of Faunus 1 and Marica, others say that he was son of Odysseus (either by Calypso 3 or by Circe), and still others say that he was the son of Telemachus and Circe (Apd.Ep.7.24; Con.3; DH.1.43.1, 1.64.2, 1.72.5-6; Hes.The.1011; Hyg.Fab.127; Plu.Rom.2.3; Strab.5.3.2; Vir.Aen.7.46-48, 7.52, 7.343ff.).

Hector 1, of the flashing helm, was the eldest among the children of King Priam 1 of Troy and Hecabe 1. He was expected to become king of Troy after his father. But as the city was attacked by the Achaean invaders, he became the leader of the alliance defending Troy. In the tenth year of the war Hector 1 was killed, and the kingdom that was his inheritance was destroyed (Apd.3.12.5-6; Apd.Ep.4.7; Dio.4.75.4; Eur.And.8; Eur.Rhe. passim; Hom.Il.2.816, 5.704, 6.395, 6.402, 22.355, 22.430 and passim; Pin.Isth.8.55, QS.1.1, 4.160).

Aeneas. At the fall of Troy, Aeneas left the city in flames, and after wandering in the Mediterranean sea, came to Italy and founded the state that later became Rome. He was son of Anchises 1 & Aphrodite (Apd.3.12.2; Apd.Ep.3.34ff., 5.21; DH.1.49.1-2, 1.62.2, 1.64.4, 1.72.1; Eur.Rhe. passim; Hes.The.1008; Hom.Aph.5.198; Hom.Il. 20.300ff.; Ov.Her.7; Ov.Fast. 3.629, 4.37; Pau.3.22.10, 10.26.2; Plu.Rom.2.1-3; QS.13.300ff.; Strab.5.3.2; Vir.Aen. passim.).


Kings of Alba
Ascanius 2. Son of Aeneas and King of Latium after his father. He is called founder of Alba on Mount Albanus. Upon his death, in the 38th year of his reign, Silvius, his brother, succeeded to the rule. DH.1.65.1, 1.66.1, 1.70.1-3, 1.72.6; Ov.Met.14.610; Pau.10.26.2; Plu.Rom.2.1; Strab.5.3.2; Vir.Aen.2.675.
Silvius. Succeeded Ascanius 2 on the throne of the Alban and Latin state. Son of Aeneas and Lavinia 2. He was father of Latinus 2 and of Silvius Aeneas. DH.1.70.1-2, 1.71.1; Ov.Fast.4.43; Ov.Met.14.610; Vir.Aen.6.763.
Silvius Aeneas or Latinus 2. Both called sons of Silvius. Latinus 2 is father of Alba. Silvius Aeneas: DH.1.71.1; Vir.Aen.6.769. Latinus 2: Dio.7.5.10; Ov.Fast.4.43; Ov.Met.14.611.
Alba. Son of Latinus 2. Alba or Alba Silvius succeeded Latinus 2 on the throne and himself, some say, was succeeded by Epytus 2. Dio.7.5.10; Ov.Fast.4.44; Ov.Met.14.612.
Capetus 4. DH.1.71.1.
Capys 2. Son of Epytus 2 and father of Capetus 2. Dio.7.5.10; Ov.Fast.4.44; Ov.Met.14.612; Vir.Aen.6.768.
Capetus 2. Succeeded his father Capys 2 in the throne of Alba and Latium, and himself was succeeded by his son Tiberinus 2. Ov.Fast.4.46; Ov.Met.14.612.
Tiberinus 2. This Tiberinus 2, also called Tiberius Silvius, drowned in the river Tiber, which was named after him. He undertook a campaign against the Etruscans, but while leading his army across the Alba river, he fell into the flood and met his death. He was father of Remulus 1 and Acrota, or else of Agrippa. Dio.7.5.10; Ov.Fast.4.47, 4.49; Ov.Met.14.614.
Agrippa or Acrota. Both called sons of Tiberinus 2. Agrippa (but some say Acrota) became king of Alba after his father (see also Acrota). Some say he was succeeded by Allodius. Agrippa had a son Remulus 1. DH.1.71.2; Dio.7.5.10. Ov.Fast.4.49.
Aventinus 2. Received the throne of Alba and Latium from Acrota. From him the place, and also the hill, took their name. Dio.7.5.12; Ov.Fast.4.51; Ov.Met.14.619.
Proca. Proca Silvius. King of Alba and Latium, over the Palatine race. Succeeded his father Aventinus 2. At his death, his younger son Amulius seized the kingship by violence. His other son was Numitor 2. Dio.7.5.12; Ov.Fast.4.52; Ov.Met.14.622; Vir.Aen.6.767.
Amulius. Governed after Proca by the force of arms. He vanquished his brother Numitor 2, and robbed him of power. He is said to have divided the whole inheritance into two parts, setting the treasures and the gold which had been brought from Troy over against the kingdom, and Numitor 2 chose the kingdom. Amulius, then in possession of the treasure, and made more powerful by it than Numitor 2, easily took the kingdom away from his brother. He ordered the twins, sons of his niece Ilia, to be sunk in the river. He is also said to have deflowered Ilia himself. He was finally killed by Romulus, who restored the kingdom to his grandfather. DH.1.77.1, 1.71.5; Dio.7.5.12; Ov.Fast.3.49, 3.67; Ov.Met.14.772; Plu.Rom.3.2, 3.3, 4.2, 8.6.
Numitor 2. Son of Proca, brother of Amulius and grandfather of Romulus and Remus 1, the founders of Rome. When he died in Alba, the throne devolved upon Romulus. He was father of Ilia, Lausus 2, Aegestus 2, and Aenitus. DH.1.76.2; Dio.7.5.12; Ov.Fast.4.53, 4.55; Ov.Met.14.773; Plu.PS.36; Plu.Rom.27.1; Vir.Aen.6.768.
Romulus. Romulus is of uncertain parentage; he has been called son of Ares, son of Latinus 1, son of a Phantom, son of Amulius and son of Aeneas. He was, along with his twin brother Remus 1, suckled by a she-wolf. Romulus founded Rome, and gave his name to the entire nation. As he saw twelve birds flying in the sky and his brother only six, Romulus was accorded the government of the city.

(See the table above for those who came after Romulus)

Related sections Trojan War
Maps: ACHAEANS & TROJANS, The Returns, The Troad
Charts: Trojan War: Connected Events (at Trojan War), Genealogy of the ACHAEAN LEADERS
Vital object: The Palladium
Other: Dares' account, The Last Days of Troy, Aftermath of the Trojan War & Returns of the Achaean Leaders, Summaries of the Trojan Cycle
Groups: ACHAEANS, ACHAEAN LEADERS, SUITORS OF HELEN, TROJAN LEADERS, TROJANS, WOODEN HORSE
Some characters: Achilles, Agamemnon, Ajax 1, Ajax 2, Briseis, Calchas, Diomedes 2, Eris, Hector 1, Helen, Iphigenia, Nestor, Odysseus, Palamedes, Paris, Patroclus 1, Polyxena 1, Priam 1, Troilus
 
Sources
Abbreviations

Some mentions of Troy: Apd.1.8.6, 1.9.13, 2.5.9, 2.7.1, 3.12.6, 3.13.8; Apd.Ep.3.5, 3.6.3.11, 3.15, 3.16, 3.17, 3.20, 3.28, 3.30, 3.32, 4.3, 4.4, 4.6, 4.7, 5.3, 5.6.5.8, 5.9, 5.10, 5.12, 5.16, 5.22, 5.23, 6.10.6.14, 6.15b, 6.19, 6.21; Hom.Il.1.129, passim; Hom.Od.1.2, 1.62, 1.237, 3.85, 3.86, 3.100, 3.220, 3.257, 3.269, 3.276, 4.99, 4.243, 4.249, 4.254, 4.257, 4.259, 4.273, 4.275, 4.330, 5.307, 5.310, 8.82, 8.224, 8.503, 8.504, 8.513, 9.38, 9.259, 10.40, 10.332, 11.160, 11.169, 11.383, 11.499, 11.510, 11.532, 11.547, 12.189, 12.190, 13.248, 13.315, 13.388, 14.71, 14.229, 14.469, 15.153, 17.119, 17.314, 18.260, 18.261, 18.266, 19.187, 22.36, 22.228, 24.27, 24.31, 24.37.

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